Lead Stories

Lisa Ryan, WBOI News

Fort Wayne And Allen County Officials Create Disability Advisory Council

Fort Wayne and Allen County officials announced Tuesday that the city and county are forming an advisory council aimed at protecting people with disabilities.

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Arts and Culture

Courtesy/Abigail King

Earth Day Tree Planting Takes Root In New Haven

Saturday is Earth Day , and beginning this Friday, Save Maumee Grassroots Organization is making it a free, 3-day public celebration in New Haven, Indiana , with a goal of planting eleven hundred trees in the city's Moser and Heatherwood Parks.

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Indiana Legislature

Holcomb Signs 'Devastating' Net Metering Bill

Gov. Eric Holcomb signed a slew of bills Tuesday , including one that overhauls the state’s net metering policy. People with renewable energy generation systems, like rooftop solar panels, sell excess energy back to utility companies. Senate Bill 309 reduces the amount future customers will receive. Existing net metering customers will continue receiving the current rate for the next 30 years. In a written statement, Holcomb said, “I support solar as an important part of Indiana’s...

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Behind The Mic

Andy Laverghetta

To WBOI's Freeform Radio Show Host, Its All About The Burnt Toast

WBOI's Burnt Toast Show is an eclectic mix of great, non-mainstream musical styles and genres, modeled after freeform radio shows of the '60s and '70s. It's on the menu every Sunday night from 8:00 to 11:00, served up live by volunteer show host, Todd Harrold .

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One night a little more than two years ago, a 24-year-old man was rushed into the emergency room at Tulane University Medical Center in Louisiana. He was extremely agitated and hallucinating.

Dr. Corey Hebert figured the man was on drugs, probably PCP or a stimulant. But a few minutes later, the man became paranoid.

"He started doing some self-mutilating actions [and] was pulling out his eyebrows and eyelashes," Hebert tells weekends on All Things Considered host Laura Sullivan.

Egypt's newly elected president, Mohammed Morsi, was sworn into office Saturday before the Supreme Constitutional Court in Cairo. Morsi is the first freely elected president of Egypt and its first Islamist head of state.

The day before his inauguration, Morsi addressed a huge crowd in Cairo's Tahrir Square, the epicenter of the revolution that ousted his predecessor, Hosni Mubarak.

"I'm standing before you, Egyptian people, those who voted for me, those who opposed me," he said. "I am yours."

Facing an unexpected ruling validating the Affordable Care Act, Republicans in Congress promised to redouble efforts to repeal it, starting with another vote in the House early next month. Host Scott Simon talks with NPR's David Welna to explain the battle ahead.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Sports: Talking Wimbledon Match-Ups

Jun 30, 2012

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SIMON: And Wimbledon is underway, the world's oldest, most esteemed, greenest and strawberries and creamiest tennis tournament. Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic seem set on the collision course for a semifinal. Maria Sharapova on course for a potential showdown with Kim Clijsters. Howard Bryant of ESPN.com, ESPN the magazine, and ESPN the full grain, fibrous and nutritious snack cracker on the line from the All England Club.

Egypt's New President Officially Sworn In

Jun 30, 2012

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Of course, Egypt has a new president - an Islamist from the once-banned Muslim Brotherhood. Mohamed Morsi took the oath of office in Cairo today, a day after appearing at Tahrir Square to proclaim that the people are the real source of power, not the generals and the supreme military council. NPR's Peter Kenyon reports from Cairo that despite the swearing-in ceremony, Mr. Morsi may not have really taken hold of the reins of power.

PRESIDENT MOHAMED MORSI: (Foreign language spoken)

Firefighters are slowly gaining ground on the Waldo Canyon fire in Colorado. It's scorched about 17,000 acres and believed to have claimed two lives.

More than 300 homes have burned. There's been a lot of talk about how many houses were lost in the fire, but Colorado Springs Fire Chief Rich Brown wants you to know there's a flip side to that: He says crews worked hard to minimize damage.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

The heat and drought that brought much of Colorado Springs into danger has also hit the Midwest. Temperatures broke 100 degrees in the Great Plains, and the heat and the lack of rain is endangering what was expected to be a bumper crop of corn. Tim Lenz is a farmer near the town of Strasburg in south central Illinois, where he grows corn and soybeans. Mr. Lenz, thanks for being with us.

TIM LENZ: Thank you.

SIMON: What's it been like there for the past couple of weeks?

For more than 30 years, Richard Miles and Reg Mead scoured the fields of their native Jersey with metal detectors, hoping to one day come across an ancient coin or two. Earlier this week, the detector beeped and they found the world's largest-ever stash of Celtic coins. Host Scott Simon speaks with Reg Mead about their find.

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