Lead Stories

Courtesy/Cinema Center

Hobnobben Festival's Coming Attractions Sweeten Local Film Scene

Cinema Center is presenting its 2nd annual multi-day, multi-venue Hobnobben Film Festival in downtown Fort Wayne, beginning on June 15th.

Read More

Arts and Culture

Courtesy/Smithsonian Institute

Veteran Fort Wayne Sculptor Reflects On Public Art Scene

Fort Wayne sculptor, Hector Garcia, has established a reputation for his craft over the past 40 years, on regional, national and international levels.

Read More

State News

Indy 500 Organ Donor Campaign Helps Grieving Families

Organ donation has become a mission for racing family’s during this year’s Indianapolis 500 with a goal of increasing the number of registered donors and through the process comes healing and hope. A Little Sister Taylor McLean was close to her brother Bryan Clauson. He was an organ donor. “Bryan was the best big brother, the most amazing person and to be able to honor him still even though he’s not here it’s been a dream come true, honestly,” says McLean. “It’s helped me grieve in ways I...

Read More

Behind The Mic

Andy Laverghetta

Keeping It Classical: Behind The Mic With WBNI Host Stan Whippo

Classical music is alive and well here at Northeast Indiana Public Radio, and volunteer host, Stan Whippo has been sharing it in the form of a live, four hour "Matinee," every weekday afternoon on our classical station, 94.1 WBNI for over 20 years.

Read More

It's a bit less likely now than a week ago that you'll hear people accuse the Supreme Court of being politicized.

That's because this week, the court ended its session with two controversial decisions — neither one of which was decided on the usual and predictable split between the five justices appointed by Republican presidents and the four appointed by Democrats.

But that doesn't make the court any less of a political animal.

In a new anti-Obama ad, Mitt Romney's campaign has struck a mother lode of delicious ironies.

The all-but-official presidential candidate's ad pushes back against the criticisms of his job-creation record as head of Bain Capital, the private equity firm.

The Greece Central School District in Western New York has decided on a punishment for the students seen bullying their 69-year-old school bus monitor on a YouTube video that went viral earlier this month.

Superintendent Barbara Deane-Williams said the parents of the four middle school students agreed to a one-year suspension and 50 hours of community service with senior citizens. They will also be required to complete a bullying prevention program.

Some of the earliest and most vocal opponents of President Obama's health care law were members of the Tea Party. In fact, health care quickly became the issue fueling the rise of the movement.

Anger over the Affordable Care Act drove the Tea Party and Republicans to big gains in the 2010 elections, but since then the movement has seen its prominence and influence wane.

Now, Tea Party activists say the Supreme Court's decision to uphold the law will reignite that original passion in time for this fall's election.

Call For Repeal Continues

When the Supreme Court upheld the central tenet of President Obama's health care law, it meant that several lower court fights on other aspects of the sweeping legislation can move forward.

Those cases, including high-profile lawsuits by Catholic organizations challenging the law's contraception coverage rules, would, obviously, have been affected if the court had found the individual mandate unconstitutional or struck down the law in its entirety.

But with the law intact, the lawsuits — many of them held in abeyance pending the high court's decision — will proceed.

In 2009, as President Obama was trying to convince Congress to pass his health care legislation, he stridently refused to characterize as a "tax" the penalty that would be imposed for not obtaining insurance under the law's individual mandate.

On Thursday, Chief Justice John Roberts begged to differ — while using the tax classification to save Obama's signature domestic accomplishment by a single Supreme Court vote.

And Republicans pounced.

For people in the medical and insurance fields, the Supreme Court's health care ruling cleared up a lot of uncertainty. But by no means all of it.

By upholding the bulk of the federal law passed in 2010, the court allowed the status quo to remain more or less in place.

A new Mississippi law requires doctors who perform abortions in the state to be board-certified OB-GYNs. They also must have privileges to admit patients at a local hospital.

The law is regulatory in nature, but at a bill-signing ceremony in April, Mississippi Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves was clear about the intent.

"We have an opportunity today with the signing of this bill to end abortion in Mississippi," he said.

Corruption is usually thought to be a bad thing. But in China, the answer is no longer crystal clear.

For decades, the country's Communist Party has declared that corruption threatens its very survival. But there are signs that this is changing. Recently, the state-run media have begun arguing that corruption can't be stamped out, so it should be contained to acceptable levels. And some corruption appears to be tacitly condoned.

In response to political reforms in Myanmar — also known as Burma — the U.S. and other Western countries have eased some sanctions targeting the country's former military rulers.

But so far, one of the most powerful institutions inside the country has kept its sanctions in place. For some time, Myanmar's Buddhist clergy have effectively been on a spiritual strike by refusing to take donations from the military — a serious blow to the former regime's legitimacy.

Pages

Support 89.1 WBOI and 94.1 WBNI

Public Media Funding

Get News Updates

Partnering With