Lead Stories

Zach Bernard/WBOI News

Sights & Sounds From The Vigil For Unity

A “Candlelight Vigil for Unity” was held on the Allen County Courthouse Green on Wednesday night, in an effort to show solidarity with victims of hate and racism over the weekend in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Read More

Arts and Culture

Hop River Brewing Joins Downtown Improvement

As Fort Wayne’s downtown riverfront activity continues to grow, Paris McFarthing and Ben Jackson are adding to the excitement, with a new business venture called Hop River Brewing Company.

Read More

State News

Trump Race Remarks, Folded Councils 'Last Straw' For Indiana Labor

President Donald Trump disbanded two of his economic advisory councils, after many members resigned in protest of his response to racist violence. Trump tweeted Wednesday he was ending his Manufacturing Council and Strategic & Policy Forum, all made up of CEOs and other industry and workforce leaders. Among those who resigned from the manufacturing group before that tweet were national AFL-CIO union president Richard Trumka and his chief of staff. I cannot sit on a council for a President...

Read More

Behind The Mic

Andy Laverghetta

WBOI Jazz Host Unwinds For The Weekend With Friday Vibe

To volunteer show host, Bill Forsythe , unwinding for the weekend means serving up a freeform mix of jazz-driven music, which he does, every other Friday night, on WBOI's "Friday Vibe."

Read More

When the Supreme Court upheld the central tenet of President Obama's health care law, it meant that several lower court fights on other aspects of the sweeping legislation can move forward.

Those cases, including high-profile lawsuits by Catholic organizations challenging the law's contraception coverage rules, would, obviously, have been affected if the court had found the individual mandate unconstitutional or struck down the law in its entirety.

But with the law intact, the lawsuits — many of them held in abeyance pending the high court's decision — will proceed.

In 2009, as President Obama was trying to convince Congress to pass his health care legislation, he stridently refused to characterize as a "tax" the penalty that would be imposed for not obtaining insurance under the law's individual mandate.

On Thursday, Chief Justice John Roberts begged to differ — while using the tax classification to save Obama's signature domestic accomplishment by a single Supreme Court vote.

And Republicans pounced.

For people in the medical and insurance fields, the Supreme Court's health care ruling cleared up a lot of uncertainty. But by no means all of it.

By upholding the bulk of the federal law passed in 2010, the court allowed the status quo to remain more or less in place.

A new Mississippi law requires doctors who perform abortions in the state to be board-certified OB-GYNs. They also must have privileges to admit patients at a local hospital.

The law is regulatory in nature, but at a bill-signing ceremony in April, Mississippi Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves was clear about the intent.

"We have an opportunity today with the signing of this bill to end abortion in Mississippi," he said.

Corruption is usually thought to be a bad thing. But in China, the answer is no longer crystal clear.

For decades, the country's Communist Party has declared that corruption threatens its very survival. But there are signs that this is changing. Recently, the state-run media have begun arguing that corruption can't be stamped out, so it should be contained to acceptable levels. And some corruption appears to be tacitly condoned.

In response to political reforms in Myanmar — also known as Burma — the U.S. and other Western countries have eased some sanctions targeting the country's former military rulers.

But so far, one of the most powerful institutions inside the country has kept its sanctions in place. For some time, Myanmar's Buddhist clergy have effectively been on a spiritual strike by refusing to take donations from the military — a serious blow to the former regime's legitimacy.

Show up at the emergency room or your doctor's office with symptoms of a serious infection, and there's a good chance you'll get an antibiotic. You might even get a few.

But antibiotics don't work on viruses. And a particular antibiotic may be suited for one kind of germ, but not another.

It's all new for Achilles: his name, his horseshoes, the surroundings at his home near Nogales, Ariz.

"To break 'em from what they're focusing on, you want to turn 'em from one side to the next," Border Patrol agent Luis Navarro says as he carefully leads Achilles into a round training arena.

Navarro holds the mustang by a short lead, and teaches it commands to trot and to slow down.

The United States Justice Department said it will not prosecute Attorney General Eric Holder for contempt of Congress.

By a vote of 373-52, the House passed a massive bill that among other things keeps the interest rate on student loans from doubling on July 1.

"The U.S. House of Representatives passed a massive bill on Friday combining funding for transportation programs, low-interest student loans, and the National Flood Insurance Program," the Reuters reports.

The Washington Post reports:

Pages

Support 89.1 WBOI and 94.1 WBNI

NPR Speaker Event

89.1 WBOI's Ten Buck Tuesday

Protect Public Media

Get News Updates

Partnering With