Jackie joined NIPR in 1999. She runs traffic for WBOI 89.1FM and WBNI 94.1FM. "Traffic" means scheduling announcements of support from underwriters and during the programs and day parts they sponsor. She is also responsible for billing and receivables, entry of payables and deposits, and assists with data entry in membership.

Ed joined NIPR as Chief Engineer in July 2006. He is responsible for two stations technical infrastructure, WBOI 89.1FM and WBNI 94.1FM, as well as three HD channels (89.1 HD-1, 2, and 3) and three internet radio streams (available at nipr.fm.).  His primary duties include repair and maintenance of transmission and broadcast equipment, providing network supervision and support, and serving as the federally-mandated, designated chief operator of WBOI and WBNI.

Africa
2:27 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

Kenya's Free Schools Bring A Torrent Of Students

Kenya's attempt at universal education faces multiple challenges. In many rural areas, families want their kids to work during the day. At this school in central Kenya, Samburu kids who herd the family livestock are now taking classes in the evening.
Tony Karumba AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 6:22 pm

Parents of U.S. students often complain about things like too many standardized tests or unhealthful school lunches. Kenya wishes it had such problems.

Kenya dropped or greatly reduced fees at public schools nearly a decade ago in an effort to make education available to all children. On one level, it's been a success — school attendance has soared. Yet this has also exacerbated chronic problems that include shortages of qualified teachers, books, desks and just about every other basic need.

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Jennifer is responsible for creating NIPR's annual budget, completing monthly financial statements, working with CPAs on the annual audit, and handles day-to-day financial needs. She also completes and submits the Corporation for Public Broadcasting annual report. Jennifer joined NIPR in March 2009.

Lea joined NIPR in Fall 2000. She organizes station special events, such as Sunday in the Park with Jazz, Jazzfest, the "Picked by the Pros" Wine Dinner, and Meet the Music Live broadcasts. She also helps coordinate appearances of NPR and public radio personalities here locally. Finally, she is responsible for several administrative tasks as well.

Law
2:07 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

Should Former Felons Have The Right To Vote?

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 3:15 pm

Transcript

JENNIFER LUDDEN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Jennifer Ludden in Washington. In a year where a tight presidential race could be determined by a few swing states, the issue of who is allowed to vote could turn the election, which is why recent moves in Florida and Iowa are getting so much attention.

Bucking a larger trend, these two states are making it harder for former felons to vote. This comes as a number of other states in recent years have made the process easier.

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Since joining NIPR in March 2011, Sean has worked to raise the news profile of WBOI by increasing its presence at public meetings, speeches and events, enhancing community relationships, and bringing WBOI to the national stage by placing local stories on NPR flagship shows and APM's Marketplace Morning Report. Sean is the local host of Morning Edition and former co-host of Midday Matters.

Opinion
1:58 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

Op-Ed: 'Ban Penn State Football'

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 2:58 pm

Transcript

JENNIFER LUDDEN, HOST:

And now, The Opinion Page. A damning report last week found that four of the most powerful people at Penn State helped cover up the child sex-abuse allegations against former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky. The report charges the college with total disregard for the safety of the victims in an attempt to avoid bad press for the university. The university also faces civil suits over the abuses. So is that the end? Sports columnist Buzz Bissinger says it should only be the beginning.

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NPR Story
1:58 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

Piecing Together Stories Of Families 'Lost In Slavery'

While many families were ripped apart, some were preserved. Charlie Crump, a former slave from North Carolina, kept ties with his granddaughter.
Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division

Originally published on Tue July 17, 2012 11:26 am

For decades, slavery tore apart African-American families. Children were sold off from their mothers, and husbands were taken from their wives. Many desperately tried to keep track of each other, even running away to find loved ones. After the Civil War and emancipation, these efforts intensified. Freed slaves posted ads in newspapers and wrote letters — seeking any clue to a family member's whereabouts.

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Katy manages programming operations and helps direct and produce on-air talent for 89.1 WBOI and 94.1 WBNI.   She has lived in Fort Wayne for most of her life and is a graduate of IPFW where she studied political science and journalism.  Though her interests and background in non-profits and public policy were what initially brought her to NIPR, she quickly found herself drawn to public radio programming and audience research.  Anderson is a strong believer in centering programming on listeners, and oversaw the station’s major programming changes over the past two years. She's also helped produce award-winning, community-oriented news programming on WBOI.

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