The Two-Way
7:09 am
Fri July 6, 2012

Just 80,000 Jobs Added In June; Unemployment Rate Stays At 8.2 Percent

The line at a job fair in New York City last month.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 6, 2012 11:43 am

Job growth was even weaker than economists feared in June as public and private employers added just 80,000 jobs to their payrolls, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported this morning. They had been expecting BLS would say there were closer to 100,000 more jobs in June than in May.

A separate BLS survey showed the nation's jobless rate remained stuck at 8.2 percent. It's been above 8 percent since February 2009.

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Geraldo Rivera of the Fox News Channel once described David Folkenflik as "a really weak-kneed, backstabbing, sweaty-palmed reporter." Others have been kinder. The Columbia Journalism Review, for example, gave him a "laurel" for his reporting that immediately led the U.S. military to institute safety measures for journalists in Baghdad.

News
4:39 am
Fri July 6, 2012

Fake Bylines Reveal True Costs Of Local News

Newspapers acknowledged publishing dozens of items in print or online from outsourcing firm Journatic that appeared under fake bylines. The Chicago Tribune, for example, said the matter is under investigation. But the newspaper's corporate parent, the Tribune Co., is a new investor in Journatic.
Charles Rex Arbogast AP

Originally published on Fri July 6, 2012 12:10 pm

Major newspapers in Chicago, Houston and San Francisco are among those this week that have acknowledged they published dozens of items in print or online that appeared under fake bylines.

As was first disclosed by the public radio program This American Life, the items in question were not written by reporters on the staffs of the papers at all but by employees of what is effectively a news outsourcing firm called Journatic.

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The Salt
3:27 am
Fri July 6, 2012

Laws That Target Homeless Imperil Programs That Feed Them Outdoors

Volunteers distribute food outside a Philadelphia Department of Public Health hearing in March on rules banning outdoor food distribution.
Alex Brandon AP

Originally published on Mon July 30, 2012 9:20 pm

A growing number of cities want to tackle the problem of homelessness by outlawing what are known as "acts of daily living" — sleeping, eating and panhandling in public. In Philadelphia, a new rule is targeting not the homeless but those who feed them.

When Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter announced the ban on serving food in public parks last March, he said moving such services indoors was part of an effort to raise standards for the homeless.

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Law
3:26 am
Fri July 6, 2012

Supreme Court Has A Term To Remember, Not Expect

The U.S. Supreme Court took on a number of high-profile cases this term, including the decision to uphold the Affordable Care Act.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 30, 2012 9:20 pm

The justices of the U.S. Supreme Court have fled Washington, leaving in their wake a storm of historic headlines. In the last 10 days alone, the high court upheld the Obama health care law, struck down much of the Arizona immigration law and ruled unconstitutional mandatory sentences of life without parole for juveniles convicted of murder.

Chief Justice John Roberts is in Malta, a place that, as he pointed out, is "an impregnable island fortress." He puckishly observed that it "seemed like a good idea" to go there after the tumultuous end of the Supreme Court term.

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StoryCorps
3:25 am
Fri July 6, 2012

Sending Vets' Lost Medals, And Memories, Home

Capt. Zachariah Fike helped reunite sisters Adeline Rockko (left) and Mary Piccoli with the Purple Heart medal of their late brother, Army Pvt. Corrado Piccoli.
Courtesy of Zachariah Fike

Originally published on Fri July 13, 2012 11:38 am

Zachariah Fike has an unusual hobby. The Vermont Army National Guard captain finds old military medals for sale in antique stores and on the Internet. But unlike most memorabilia collectors, Zac doesn't keep the medals for himself.

Instead, he tracks down the medals' rightful owners, and returns them.

His effort to reunite families with lost medals all began with a Christmas gift from his mother — a Purple Heart, found in an antique shop and engraved with the name Corrado A.G. Piccoli.

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Research News
3:25 am
Fri July 6, 2012

Dead Reefs Can Come Back To Life, Study Says

Coral polyps feed in the plankton-rich waters by Santa Catalina, Panama. A new study of coral reefs off the Pacific coast of Panama shows that dead coral reefs may be able to recover from rising ocean temperatures and other environmental disasters.
laszlo-photo Flickr

Originally published on Fri July 6, 2012 12:10 pm

Coral reefs may be able to recover from disaster, according to a study that provides a bit of reassurance about the future of these endangered ecosystems.

Coral reefs around the world are at risk as the ocean's temperature continues to rise. Those trends could kill not only coral but also the fish and other species that depend on the reefs. Those reefs are important for people as well.

'Shocking' Reef History

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Around the Nation
3:19 am
Fri July 6, 2012

Despite Delays, Chair Lifts Coming To Public Pools

New government regulations require public pools to have chair lifts, like this one in Savannah, Ga., for people with disabilities. The compliance deadline has been extended for a second time.
Russ Bynum AP

Originally published on Mon July 30, 2012 9:20 pm

Pools open to the public were supposed to have chair lifts installed for people with disabilities in time for this summer, but after a wave of protests, the federal order was delayed until January.

Still, some of the country's 300,000 or so pools at hotels, parks and gyms continue to fight the requirement.

Vestavia Hills pool near Birmingham, Ala., is one of thousands of pools that scrambled to get a chair lift installed by May.

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Health
3:18 am
Fri July 6, 2012

Kenya's HIV Challenge: Easing Stigma For Gay Men

Originally published on Mon July 30, 2012 9:20 pm

Health officials in Kenya say reducing the transmission of HIV among gay men is a central part of their national AIDS strategy. But they face serious challenges, including the fact that homosexuality is still a crime in the East African nation.

HIV rates among gay and bisexual men in Kenya are far higher than the national average.

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