Barry Gordemer

Barry Gordemer is an award-winning writer and producer and director for NPR's Morning Edition. He's helped produce and direct NPR coverage of two Persian Gulf wars, five presidential elections, the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, and hurricane Katrina. He's also produced numerous profiles of actors, musicians, and writers.

His career in radio spans more than 25 years, beginning at NPR member station WFAE in Charlotte North Carolina, and including stops at Minnesota Public Radio and A Prairie Home Companion.

In 2000, Barry received special recognition from the George Foster Peabody Awards for his long-time service to Morning Edition.

Barry also is the founder of Handemonium, a company that designs and creates puppets for television and film. In 2003, Barry received a Telly award for his puppet designs and his performance as Alphie the Alligator on the DVD series, "The Sound and the Furry."

In 2000, Barry performed on the CD Dreamosauraus. It received a Grammy nomination for "Best Musical Album for Kids."

Just like comedian Rodney Dangerfield, the microwave oven often gets no respect. Every kitchen has one, but no self-respecting cook would admit to using it for anything more than just heating up last night's pasta. But it's hard to deny the influence the food-nuker has had on American life, and this year marks 50 years since its arrival.

The first countertop microwave was the Amana Radarange, which debuted in 1967 and sold for $495. It's the appliance that made zapping your food as routine as brushing your teeth.

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Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

I'm Renee Montagne and - David - David, are you there?

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The United Nations has declared Friday World Radio Day in celebration of radio's unique status as a "simple and inexpensive" technology with the power to reach even the most remote, marginalized communities.

But we wondered — in this digital age, how hard is it to find a simple, inexpensive radio?

Our journey took us to several stores in Washington, D.C., in search of a portable and affordable radio, as well as to the National Capital Radio and Television Museum in Bowie, Md.