Elise Hu

Elise Hu is a reporter who covers the intersection of technology and culture for NPR's on-air, online and multimedia platforms. Beginning in 2015, she will be assigned to the network's new bureau in Seoul, South Korea.

She joined NPR in 2011 to coordinate the digital development and editorial vision for the StateImpact network, a state government reporting project focused on member stations.

Before joining NPR, she was one of the founding reporters who helped launch The Texas Tribune, a non-profit digital news startup devoted to politics and public policy. While at the Tribune, Hu oversaw television partnerships and multimedia projects; contributed to The New York Times' expanded Texas coverage and pushed for editorial innovation across platforms.

An honors graduate of the University of Missouri-Columbia's School of Journalism, she previously worked as the state political reporter for KVUE-TV in Austin, WYFF-TV in Greenville, SC, and reported from Asia for the Taipei Times.

Her work has earned a Gannett Foundation Award for Innovation in Watchdog Journalism, a National Edward R. Murrow award for best online video, beat reporting awards from the Texas Associated Press and The Austin Chronicle once dubiously named her the "Best TV Reporter Who Can Write."

Outside of work, Hu is an adjunct instructor at Northwestern University and Georgetown University's journalism schools. She's also an adviser to the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, where she keeps up with emerging media and technology as a panelist for the Knight News Challenge.

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Technology
4:29 pm
Thu December 25, 2014

Online Sellers Pop Up In Real Life, For A Limited Time Only

One-click shopping is changing the ways people shop and retailers sell their wares. But some online retailers are opening physical stores — some of which last as short as a day. (This story originally aired on All Things Considered on July 28, 2014.)

All Tech Considered
8:02 am
Wed December 24, 2014

In Its Strange Journey, 'The Interview' Becomes An Art House Film

The Alamo Drafthouse theater chain will show The Interview starting on Christmas Day.
Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed December 24, 2014 8:59 am

A buddy flick about killing North Korean dictator Kim Jung Un will be shown on Christmas Day after all, at least in about 200 independent theaters. This kind of small-scale distribution model and the politics surrounding The Interview give what was once a big-budget Hollywood release the spirit of an art house film.

In the satirical film, which is at the center of a geopolitical tussle, Seth Rogen and James Franco play television producers who get an interview with Kim but are then hired by the CIA to "take him out."

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Movies
5:08 am
Wed December 24, 2014

More Than 200 Theaters To Show 'The Interview' On Christmas Day

Originally published on Wed December 24, 2014 7:46 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

All Tech Considered
5:18 am
Sat December 13, 2014

Tech Week: Instagram Vs. Twitter And Europe Vs. Google

Instagram topped Twitter in active users in its latest count.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

If you've been too busy finalizing holiday vacation plans and buying gifts, we're here to catch you up on the tech headlines you may have missed from NPR and beyond.

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All Tech Considered
10:08 am
Sat December 6, 2014

Tech Week: Online Threats, N. Korean Threats And RIP Clip Art

Sony Pictures is still investigating who hacked its systems and leaked sensitive information, including unreleased films.
Frederic J. Brown AFP/Getty Images

The week in tech began with arguments before the Supreme Court and ended with another data breach. This time it's the clothing chain Bebe. Here's a look back at other tech stories you should know about from NPR and beyond.

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All Tech Considered
5:30 pm
Thu December 4, 2014

North Korea's Cyber Skills Get Attention Amid Sony Hacking Mystery

James Franco (left) and Seth Rogen in The Interview. The North Korean dictator promised "merciless counter-measures" if this film was released.
Ed Araquel AP

Originally published on Wed December 10, 2014 12:32 pm

The most closed country on earth — North Korea — is now denying its involvement in one of the biggest corporate hacks in history.

Someone attacked Sony Pictures Entertainment last week and made public troves of stolen data, including five unreleased films, medical records and salaries of nearly 7,000 global employees. But before a recent denial — another North Korean diplomat played coy about the country's involvement.

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All Tech Considered
2:01 pm
Mon December 1, 2014

As Supreme Court Considers Online Threats, An Update On Justin Carter

An undated photo of Justin Carter, who's facing a felony "terroristic threat" charge in Texas.
Courtesy of Jack Carter

Originally published on Wed December 3, 2014 11:57 am

The Supreme Court is tackling an interesting question Monday: When is a seemingly threatening online message a crime?

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The Two-Way
10:33 am
Thu November 27, 2014

A Nationwide Outpouring Of Support For Tiny Ferguson Library

The Ferguson Public Library.
Elise Hu NPR

Originally published on Sat November 29, 2014 12:12 pm

The Ferguson Public Library is just a block away from the center of demonstrations at the Ferguson Police Department. As we've reported, when violent protests this week led to the burning of more than a dozen businesses and the uncertainty caused schools to close, the library stayed open.

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The Two-Way
4:58 pm
Tue November 25, 2014

The Psychological Effects Of Seeing Police Everywhere In Ferguson

A police officer guards a closed street where protesters and looters rampaged businesses following the grand jury decision in the fatal shooting of Michael Brown, in Ferguson, Mo., on Tuesday.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed November 26, 2014 9:31 am

After a night of unrest and violence, police are posted at every intersection in Ferguson, Mo. National Guard troops man camouflaged Humvees in strip mall parking lots. The governor ordered more. Is it making the community feel safer?

One thing's for sure: It's keeping people from moving about as they normally would during this holiday week.

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The Two-Way
2:26 am
Tue November 25, 2014

Crowds Confront Police, Businesses Burn In Ferguson Chaos

Police gather on the street as protesters react after the announcement of the grand jury decision Monday in Ferguson, Mo. A grand jury decided not to indict Ferguson police Officer Darren Wilson in the death of Michael Brown, the unarmed, black 18-year-old whose fatal shooting sparked sometimes violent protests.
Charlie Riedel AP

Originally published on Tue November 25, 2014 9:07 am

In the moments before midnight in Ferguson, so many businesses were ablaze at once, and so many demonstrations had broken out in St. Louis County neighborhoods, that a local officer put it this way: "We've lost control of the area a little bit; we recommend just getting out of the area completely."

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