Leila Fadel

Leila Fadel is NPR's international correspondent based in Cairo.

Before joining NPR, she covered the Middle East for The Washington Post. In her role as Cairo Bureau Chief she reported on a wave of revolts and their aftermaths in Libya, Tunisia, Egypt, and Syria.

Prior to her position as Cairo Bureau Chief for the Post, she covered the Iraq war for nearly five years with Knight Ridder, McClatchy Newspapers and later the Washington Post. Her foreign coverage of the devastating human toll of the Iraq war earned her the George. R. Polk award in 2007.

Leila Fadel is a Lebanese-American journalist who speaks conversational Arabic and was raised in Saudi Arabia and Lebanon.

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Movies
5:04 am
Mon July 13, 2015

Egypt Mourns Omar Sharif, Its Homegrown Cinema Star

Originally published on Mon July 13, 2015 12:48 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Parallels
12:39 pm
Fri June 26, 2015

A Muslim-Jewish Love Story On Egyptian TV Sends Sparks Flying

A still from Haret al Yahood.
Haret al Yahood

Originally published on Fri June 26, 2015 9:20 pm

Ahmed Kardous sets up an establishing shot. He trains the camera on the actors standing on a cliff overlooking a valley of greenery, and someone yells out, "Action."

Kardous is the director of photography for this Ramadan's breakout television show in Egypt. It's called Haret el-Yahood, or The Jewish Quarter.

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Parallels
8:56 am
Fri June 19, 2015

The Business Of Smuggling Migrants Across The Mediterranean

Some 800 migrants from the Middle East arrive at the Greek port of Piraeus on Sunday. Smugglers are charging thousands of dollars to take migrants across the Mediterranean, and prices can vary widely. Children are often allowed to travel for free.
Anadolu Agency Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 19, 2015 11:06 am

The massive wave of people fleeing the Middle East and Africa face dangerous conditions to make the trip across the Mediterranean Sea, crowded onto rickety boats and overloaded ships. An estimated 2,000 migrants have died so far this year alone.

But, despite the danger, the burgeoning business of smuggling migrants has taken on some retail features.

Smugglers sending desperate migrants from Egypt to Europe are looking to make money — but they do offer discounts. Small children can go for free; migrants who organize a group can go free, as a sort of referral bonus.

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Parallels
3:50 pm
Thu June 11, 2015

As Egyptian Activists Vanish, Suspicion Falls On The Security Forces

Egyptian security forces take up positions during anti-government demonstrations in Cairo last November. Egyptian activists have been disappearing in growing numbers, and human rights groups say they believe the security forces are responsible.
Amr Sayed APA\Landov

Originally published on Thu June 11, 2015 6:49 pm

It happens suddenly. One day, without warning, someone goes out to run an errand or go to class, and they don't come home.

Forced disappearances by Egypt's security forces aren't a new tactic in Egypt, but they're on the rise, human rights groups and activists say. And a cross section of activists, human rights defenders and journalists are being targeted.

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Middle East
5:18 pm
Mon June 8, 2015

Syrian Mother Sends Children Across Mediterranean With Smugglers

Originally published on Mon June 8, 2015 6:56 pm

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Parallels
6:28 am
Sat May 30, 2015

Mecca Becomes A Mecca For Skyscraper Hotels

An aerial view of the Grand Mosque in the holy city of Mecca in October 2014.
Muhammad Hamed Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sat May 30, 2015 11:14 am

At the Grand Mosque in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, the booming call to prayer competes with the racket of construction.

The Grand Mosque is the destination for the most sacred Muslim pilgrimage and it holds the Kaaba, the black cube of a building in the center of the mosque known to Muslims as the House of God.

But skyscraper hotels increasingly dominate the skyline, dwarfing the Great Mosque where worshippers gather, and angering those who seek to retain the city's history and traditional architecture.

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Middle East
7:37 am
Sat May 9, 2015

Saudi Shiites Fear A Backlash Over War In Yemen

Originally published on Sun May 10, 2015 6:29 am

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Parallels
4:42 am
Thu April 30, 2015

Saudi King Salman Reshuffles Line Of Succession

Earlier this month, Mohammed bin Salman, Saudi Arabia's new deputy crown prince, met with Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sissi in Cairo.
Egyptian Presidency Handout EPA /Landov

Originally published on Thu April 30, 2015 4:42 pm

Things are changing in Saudi Arabia. The new king made a surprising move this week, choosing his nephew to take over as crown prince and his son to take the position of deputy crown prince.

The decision marks a generational shift. For the first time, a grandson of the founder of the kingdom is heir to the throne. And one young prince, the son of King Salman, is emerging as a war hero for many Saudis as the country continues to carry out airstrikes in Yemen.

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Middle East
4:42 pm
Tue April 21, 2015

Saudi Arabia Says It Is Ending Airstrikes In Yemen

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 7:20 am

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Parallels
4:05 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

Saudi Airstrikes Raise Doubts Abroad, Spark Patriotic Fervor At Home

Saudi Arabia's army fires artillery shells toward Houthi rebels along the Saudi border with Yemen on April 15. Outside Saudi Arabia, many are critical of the military campaign and question whether it will succeed, but it is popular inside the kingdom.
STR Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue April 21, 2015 5:34 pm

Saudi airstrikes in Yemen began almost a month ago, targeting rebels who have taken over much of the country.

Internationally, there are concerns about increasing casualties and questions about the strategy in the Saudi operation, which is receiving help from the U.S., among others.

But at home in the kingdom, the war has sparked a patriotic fervor that's noticeable just about everywhere you turn.

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