Lynn Neary

Lynn Neary is an NPR arts correspondent and a frequent guest host often heard on Morning Edition and Weekend Edition.

In her role on the Arts desk, Neary reports on an industry in transition as publishing moves into the digital age. As she covers books and publishing, she relishes the opportunity to interview many of her favorite authors from Barbara Kingsolver to Ian McEwan.

Arriving at NPR in 1982, Neary spent two years working as a newscaster during Morning Edition. Then, for the next eight years, Neary was the host of Weekend All Things Considered. In 1992, she joined the cultural desk to develop NPR's first religion beat. As religion correspondent, Neary covered the country's diverse religious landscape and the politics of the religious right.

Over the years Neary has won numerous prestigious awards including the Robert F. Kennedy Journalism award, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting Gold Award, an Ohio State Award, an Association of Women in Radio and Television Award and the Gabriel award. For her reporting on the role of religion in the debate over welfare reform, Neary shared in NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton Award.

A Fordham University graduate with a Bachelor of Arts in English, Neary thinks she has the ideal job and suspects she is the envy of English majors everywhere.

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Remembrances
6:21 pm
Wed July 22, 2015

Doctorow Wove Fact And Fiction To Imagine America As It Could Be

The way E.L. Doctorow told it, the phrase "historical novel" is something of a misnomer when it comes to his writing. "I think really of myself as a national novelist; I am an American novelist writing about my country."
Mary Altaffer AP

Originally published on Wed July 22, 2015 7:35 pm

E.L. Doctorow used to tell a story about a journalism class he took as a high school student in the Bronx. As he told NPR back in 2003, he wrote a profile of a doorman at Carnegie Hall who was beloved by all the performers there. His teacher, apparently, loved the story so much, she wanted to publish the story in the school paper — so she told Doctorow to get a photo of the man.

There was just one problem.

"I hadn't expected that kind of enthusiasm," Doctorow recalled, "and I said, well, 'Not exactly, there is no Carl.' I made him up."

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Book News & Features
3:43 am
Fri May 29, 2015

A Year Later, #WeNeedDiverseBooks Has Left Its Mark On BookCon

In 2014, BookCon responded to the We Need Diverse Books campaign by inviting it to form its own panel. Pictured here (from left): I.W. Gregorio, Mike Jung, Matt de la Pena, Grace Lin and Jacqueline Woodson.
Courtesy of ReedPOP

Originally published on Fri May 29, 2015 3:10 pm

Publishing's big week is almost over. The industry's annual convention, BookExpo America, ends Friday in New York, and on Saturday the publishing world opens its doors to the public with BookCon, where avid readers will get the chance to mix and mingle with their favorite authors.

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The Salt
3:40 am
Tue May 12, 2015

In 'Organic Life,' The Making Of America's First Certified Organic Restaurant

Chef, cookbook author and owner of Washington, D.C.'s Restaurant Nora, Nora Pouillon, in the restaurant's garden.
Courtesy of Noras.com

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 12:56 pm

When restaurateur Nora Pouillon moved to the United States from Austria in the 1960s, she was surprised by how hard it was to get really fresh food. Everything was packaged and processed. Pouillon set out to find the find the best ingredients possible to cook for her family and friends. She brought that same sensibility to her Restaurant Nora, which eventually became the first certified organic restaurant in the country.

Pouillon writes about her lifelong devotion to food in a new memoir, My Organic Life: How A Pioneering Chef Helped Shape The Way We Eat Today.

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Book News & Features
4:38 pm
Mon March 9, 2015

Straight To Audiobook: Authors Write Original Works Meant To Be Heard

Alexandru Petrea iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue March 10, 2015 10:57 am

In recent years while e-books were plowing their way through the publishing industry like a big noisy steam engine, audiobooks were chugging along in the background like the Little Engine That Could. These days, that sometimes overlooked segment of the book business is growing at a rapid pace and the industry is looking for new ways to catch listeners' ears.

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Remembrances
4:29 pm
Fri March 6, 2015

Albert Maysles, Pioneering Documentary Filmmaker, Dies

Originally published on Fri March 6, 2015 7:04 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Television
6:29 pm
Fri February 13, 2015

See What 'Saturday Night Live' Looks Like The Rest Of The Week

Roseanne Roseannadanna (Gilda Radner) with Jane Curtin in 1979.
Edie Baskin Taschen

Originally published on Sat February 14, 2015 7:17 am

When Saturday Night Live went on the air 40 years ago, few would have guessed how many of the cast members would go on to become household names. But you've probably never heard of Edie Baskin and Mary Ellen Matthews. They're the official photographers on Saturday Night Live and their combined careers have spanned the life of the show. A collection of their work has been published to coincide with this year's anniversary broadcast on Sunday.

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Book News & Features
6:42 pm
Wed February 4, 2015

Harper Lee's Friend Says Author Is Hard Of Hearing, Sound Of Mind

Author Harper Lee attends a ceremony in Montgomery, Ala., in 2007.
Rob Carr AP

Originally published on Thu February 5, 2015 7:35 am

News that a second novel by Harper Lee will be published next July has thrilled fans of her first novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, but it has also been met with some skepticism and concern. Lee has been involved in several legal skirmishes and controversies in recent years, raising questions about whether she is being taken advantage of in her old age.

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Book News & Features
5:47 pm
Mon February 2, 2015

'Adventures Of Beekle' Wins Caldecott; Newbery Goes To 'The Crossover'

In Dan Santat's The Adventures of Beekle, an imaginary friend sets out to find a child who needs him.
Courtesy of Little Brown and Company Books for Young Readers

Originally published on Wed February 4, 2015 11:39 am

Parents on the hunt for great kids' books get some help each year when the American Library Association gives out its Youth Media Awards. On Monday, the association announced a long list of winners in a variety of categories.

The two that get the most attention are the John Newbery Medal for most outstanding contribution to children's literature and the Randolph Caldecott Medal for picture book artistry. This year's Newbery went to Kwame Alexander's The Crossover, and the Caldecott went to Dan Santat's The Adventures of Beekle: The Unimaginary Friend.

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Book News & Features
3:31 am
Wed December 31, 2014

Vocab Tech For Toddlers Encourages 'Anytime, Anywhere Learning'

The Sesame Workshop app called Big Bird's Words helps children not only learn new vocabulary, but also understand the interconnectedness between words.
Sesame Workshop

Originally published on Wed December 31, 2014 11:54 am

When the children's television show Sesame Street first hit the air in 1969, many were deeply skeptical that you could use TV to introduce very young children to the basics of reading and math. But the experiment proved to be a remarkable success; Sesame Street has reached several generations of toddlers with its combination of educational content and pure entertainment. And now, Sesame Workshop is using new technology to reach the next generation.

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Book News & Features
5:06 am
Mon December 29, 2014

Nonprofit Fights Illiteracy By Getting Books To Kids Who Need Them

First Book President and CEO Kyle Zimmer reads to children during a book distribution event.
Courtesy of First Book

Originally published on Fri February 6, 2015 3:09 pm

When it comes to learning to read, educators agree: the younger, the better. Children can be exposed to books even before they can talk, but for that a family has to have books, which isn't always the case.

There are neighborhoods in this country with plenty of books; and then there are neighborhoods where books are harder to find. Almost 15 years ago, Susan Neuman, now a professor at New York University, focused on that discrepancy, in a study that looked at just how many books were available in Philadelphia's low-income neighborhoods. The results were startling.

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