Annie E. Casey Foundation

Indiana is losing ground compared to other states when it comes to children’s overall well-being.  That’s according to new data from the Annie E Casey’s Foundation’s Kids Count report.  But the Indiana Youth Institute says the drop in rankings isn’t as bad as it sounds.

In the 2014 edition of Kids Count, Indiana ranked 27th in children’s overall well-being.  This year, that dropped to 32nd. 

Courtesy/Carl Jylland-Halverson

Since it's the holiday season and we're in a playful mood, we're just going to come out and say it: toys rule!

It seems everyone has a memory of a favorite childhood toy: a doll, a truck, a ball or a game that brings warm memories immediately to the surface.

But toys and the play they inspire have been around for thousands of years, dating back to prehistory. And while the types and packaging may have changed, the point -- having fun and learning -- has not.

A study committee this summer will look at streamlining Indiana’s adoption process to further Governor Mike Pence’s goal of promoting adoption in the state.

Legislation passed this year funds a new adoption tax credit, about one thousand dollars per adopted child.  It also creates an adoption study committee made up of people with experience in the field, including representatives from the Department of Child Services and adoption agencies, adoptive parents, and judges with adoption case experience. 

Courtesy / Annie E. Casey Foundation

As we reported earlier this week, the Annie E. Casey Foundation has released its latest study examining how kids of different races fare when it comes to meeting developmental milestones on time.

The findings are striking, though not necessarily surprising.

Black, Latino, and Native American children are lagging behind – in some cases, far behind their white and Asian-American peers.

"Race for Results" / Annie E. Casey Foundation

A new study released Tuesday finds Indiana among the ten worst states for black children, highlighting the disparity in opportunity between African-American youth and their peers.

The policy report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation, titled "Race for Results," measures 12 factors in an effort to chart child progression nationwide. Those include everything from reading proficiency to graduation rates to the number of children living near or below the federal poverty level.

IYI: Impoverished students need breakfast, too

Aug 10, 2012
Scott Bauer acquired from USDA ARS

As child poverty in Indiana continues to increase, the Indiana Youth Institute is stressing the need for schools to offer breakfast programs.

Ten years ago, child poverty was in the single digits in Indiana.  It now sits at 22 percent. 

There are many ripple effects associated with the increase, including a growing number of students relying on school breakfast programs -- participation is up nearly 60% since 2005.

Still, Indiana Youth Institute President Bill Stanczykiewicz is concerned there are kids who aren’t getting a good breakfast.