EPA

Alan Berning (Flickr)

Indiana could be forced to reduce power plant emissions that cause smog because of a lawsuit filed by six northeastern states against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman filed the lawsuit along with Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont last week. Those states are asking the EPA to add Indiana and Illinois, Kentucky, Michigan, North Carolina, Ohio, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia to the Ozone Transport Region (OTR).

ArturNyk (Shutterstock.com)

The Environmental Protection Agency has recently toughened pollution standards for toxic emissions and regulations are likely to increase in the future. The new rules push utilities towards cleaner energy production, but they’re also costly.

Coal-fired power plants in Indiana are balancing federal demands with business pressures in a number of ways.

New EPA Rules Mean Changes for Indiana Power Plants

Aug 6, 2015
Daniel X. O'Neil (Flickr)

Indiana must reduce the carbon dioxide its power plants emit by about a third in the next fifteen years.

The mandate comes as part of new Environmental Protection Agency rules President Obama announced this week. The rules require each state to put together a plan on how it will reach the new EPA goals.

The sound of dump trucks and 80-foot cranes moving steel beams fills a small, windy county road outside of Martinsville. The construction means there will soon be not one but two large power plants standing side by side.

Courtesy / Office of the Attorney General

Indiana Attorney General Greg Zoeller says the Hoosier State will join a lawsuit challenging the Environmental Protection Agency’s new water rule.  Zoeller says he’s concerned about the potential cost to the state’s agricultural industry.

The EPA recently finalized a rule broadening the definition of “waters of the United States” – that is, which bodies of water fall under federal regulation.  The term would now include small bodies of water, including streams, ponds, and drainage ditches.  Regulating those types of small waterways has always been left up to the states.