ethics

Opinion: The Ethics of Accountability at IPFW

Nov 4, 2016
NORTHEAST INDIANA REGIONAL PARTNERSHIP

Jeff Gruettert is one of my favorite students from my time at IPFW. He’s good-natured, curious, smart, and hard-working. He minored in Professional and Applied Ethics, and as part of the course work, interned at 3BG—a small business in downtown Fort Wayne. Since graduation, he has worked at 3BG as Operations Manager and was even given company equity, which is rare in the small business community.

Sol Danmeri / Flickr

I’ve never really gotten into gossip publications or TV shows. I can kind of understand the appeal—the desire to live vicariously through the rumored celebrations and, perhaps more so, the rumored failures of celebrities. Similarly, I don’t really care to see the medical records of Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump. Maybe if I could understand the reasoning behind seeing them, I’d have a different view.

Brandon Smith / Indiana Public Broadcasting

A House committee Tuesday unanimously approved a bill creating what Speaker Brian Bosma calls the first major ethics code revision in at least 20 years.  The bill comes in the wake of several ethics scandals over the last year.

Bosma says the Statehouse culture has not been one of corruption, but there hasn’t been enough attention paid to the potential appearance of conflicts of interest.  He says the ethics reform bill’s goal is to increase transparency in an effort to reaffirm the public’s trust. 

Courtesy / INDOT

Members of the Indiana Ethics Commission say they have serious concerns about a senior INDOT official leaving his position to work for a company he’s helped steer state contracts toward.

INDOT Chief of Staff Troy Woodruff is in negotiations to work for RQAW, an engineering firm that does business with INDOT.  While he’s working out an employment deal, Woodruff has put in place a screening procedure that ensures he isn’t involved with any state business that deals with RQAW.