Gay Marriage

Attorney General Greg Zoeller says the judicial system is the right place for the fate of Indiana’s gay  marriage ban statute to be decided. 

During the legislative debate over HJR-3, the proposed constitutional amendment banning same sex  marriage, lawmakers often said the purpose of the amendment was to provide added protection for  Indiana’s marriage statute, which defines marriage as between one man and one woman.

The common  refrain from people like Speaker Brian Bosma was that the question of marriage in Indiana shouldn’t be  decided by one person.

Speaker Brian Bosma says a recent poll commissioned by House and Senate Republicans clearly indicates  that Hoosiers want to have their say at the ballot box on the proposed amendment banning same sex  marriage.  

The House and Senate GOP caucuses commissioned a phone survey of registered voters that took place  last week asking Hoosiers for their view on the same sex marriage ban amendment known as HJR-3.  

53 percent of those surveyed say they support the amendment, contrary to earlier poll numbers put out by  Freedom Indiana, a coalition opposing the measure.  

In a few weeks the Indiana legislature will make a decision on whether to vote on a constitutional amendment that bans same-sex marriage. If it passes, it will go before voters next year.

If you thought that same-sex marriage was already illegal in Indiana, you’d be right. Current state law says marriage is between one man, and one woman, and that’s that. Also banned is any kind of legal recognition for same sex couples, including domestic partnerships and civil unions.

Indiana Senator Joe Donnelly Friday publicly announced his support of same-sex marriage, saying he changed his position in light of recent Supreme Court arguments and public discussion. The Democratic U.S. Senator’s support could influence the issue in the Statehouse.

In a statement released on his Facebook page, Senator Joe Donnelly said he opposes amending both the Indiana and U.S. constitutions to ban same-sex marriage, much as a proposed amendment to Indiana’s constitution would do if passed a second time by the General Assembly and then by voters.