HIP 2.0

Courtesy / State of Indiana

It’s been nearly six months since HIP 2.0 was approved, and the state has enrolled nearly 300,000 Hoosiers in the health insurance program.  More than a dozen health care advocacy groups and insurers sang the praises of the program at a public forum Thursday.

As of July 1st, a little more than 289,000 residents have signed up for health care coverage through HIP 2.0.  186 thousand of them never had health insurance before.  And 70 percent of enrollees are using HIP Plus, which requires contributions to a health savings account. 

Courtesy / State of Indiana

Hundreds of thousands of Hoosiers have enrolled in Governor Pence’s healthcare program HIP 2.0 since rollout began earlier this year.  But the state wants more people to sign up, launching an ad campaign Monday to promote the program.

Halfway through its first year, more than 283,000 Hoosiers are participating in HIP 2.0.  And Family and Social Services Administration spokesman Jim Gavin says so far, enrollment has largely been achieved through word of mouth.

Gretchen Frazee / Indiana Public Broadcasting

Governor Mike Pence Tuesday announced that federal officials have approved his healthcare expansion  plan known as HIP 2.0. Pence says it’s an effort  that will reform and improve Medicaid in what he calls “the Indiana way.” 

Federal officials approved essentially everything Governor Pence asked for. The program includes HIP  Basic, a default plan for poorer Hoosiers that doesn’t require them to pay into a health savings account  but comes with fewer benefits and includes co-pays. 

Governor Mike Pence says he wants to meet with President Obama to discuss what he calls increasing frustration over a lack of progress in getting approval for his proposed healthcare expansion. 

Pence sent the president a letter requesting a meeting during his visit to Indiana Friday where he’ll discuss improvements in the economy.

The governor says he wants to deliver a message that the proposed expansion of the state’s health insurance program for low-income Hoosiers is not an idea; it’s a proven program. 

Governor Mike Pence says there are scenarios in which Indiana might not move ahead with healthcare expansion as the state and federal government discuss the proposed plan known as HIP 2.0. Pence says “differences remain” after his meeting with Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell.  

Pence has long ruled out using federal dollars from the Affordable Care Act to expand traditional Medicaid. Instead, he’s pushed use of the Healthy Indiana Plan as a vehicle to deliver affordable health insurance to around 300,000 Hoosiers within the coverage gap.