justice

Brandon Smith/IPB News

On tonight’s program, we’ll hear from Indiana Governor Eric Holcomb for the State of the State address and Indiana Chief Justice Loretta Rush for the State of the Judiciary. Both addresses were recorded earlier this month and will cover a variety of topics such as the creation of regional drug and veteran courts, workforce development to fill thousands of vacancies in the state, and infrastructure improvements on track to be completed in coming years.

Part One: State of the State

Part Two: State of the Judiciary

Courtesy / ACLU

Indiana’s religious freedom law known as RFRA will be used for the first time in a suit challenging a new state law that bars sex offenders from churches.

A new law that went into effect Wednesday says people convicted of sex offenses against children cannot enter school property.  And ACLU-Indiana legal director Ken Falk says because that phrase “school property” is broadly written, it could mean that offenders can’t attend religious services if the church is next to a school. 

NPR / Doby Photography

Nina Totenberg has a lot of superlatives to her name.

As NPR's Legal Affairs Correspondent, she's a built a career as a legendary journalist, with a voice and style all her own. She's won countless awards for her work covering the U.S. Supreme Court and other legal matters. And she’s one of NPR’s "Founding Mothers," the group of female reporters who shaped the network from its earliest days.

One thing she's not: a fortune-teller.

Courtesy / Wikimedia Commons

A Senate committee Tuesday approved legislation expanding the statute of limitations in rape cases.

Under current law, the statute of limitations to prosecute for rape is five years.  Jenny Ewing, a former Indiana resident, says she was raped in 2005 but, in her words, “made the mistake” of not reporting it. 

Her attacker recently confessed to police, but because the five-year statute of limitations had expired, authorities were unable to prosecute him. 

File

An attorney for former Indiana Secretary of State Charlie White says state law was misapplied when White was convicted in 2012 of six criminal counts stemming from voter fraud.  Arguments in the case took place Tuesday before the state Court of Appeals.

White’s appeal included several arguments – the jury wasn’t properly instructed, selective prosecution, his attorney at the time – Carl Brizzi – was ineffective. 

But when pressed by the Appeals Court judges for the strongest argument, White’s current attorney Andrea Ciobanu says it’s misapplication of the law. 

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