Nature

ACRES Land Trust

If you’ve ever spent your summer days by the pool, playing sports in the park, or just being outside, cicadas singing to each other, back and forth is a familiar sound.

Spring Lake Woods and Bog opened to the public this weekend. The trail on the northwest side of Fort Wayne is close to the city’s only natural lake. It includes a natural bog and plant life rare to this part of the country.

Changing Weather Means Tapping into a Sweet Season

Mar 26, 2015
Courtesy / ACRES Land Trust

When late winter and early spring come around, it means just one thing for those at the sugar bush stands scattered across Northeast Indiana: it’s syrup season.

The tradition of tapping sugar maple trees for their sweet sap predates the European arrival in North America, and while some of the technology has changed, the process remains largely the same (and the product completely delicious).

But it takes a lot of work – and a lot of help from the trees and the weather – to turn the natural energy stored in maples into the syrups and candies you’ll find on store shelves.

Courtesy/Fred Wooley

Sometimes it's good to leave serious news behind and step outside for a moment, but hopefully not step in the things that animals leave behind. 

This conversation is about animal scat, and the man who recently led a fascinating and entertaining tour on the subject for the conservation group, ACRES.

For more than three decades, Fred Wooley has served as park interpreter for Pokagon State Park, and he has more than a few accolades and fans among park visitors.