Community Action of Northeast Indiana, or CANI, has a new name as  of Wednesday. 

The nonprofit poverty-fighting agency will now be known as Brightpoint. The organization’s President and CEO Steve Hoffman says the name change is in  response to a lack of name recognition and understanding of the organization’s  mission. 

But that doesn’t mean clients who need assistance have trouble finding them.  Hoffman says most years, their programs have waiting lists and tap out their  funding.

Courtesy/Lorelei VerLee

December 10th is Human Rights Day, a global celebration formally established by the United Nations in 1950.  

Poverty is among the most pressing human rights challenges in the world, and here in Fort Wayne, one organization is tackling the issue with what they call "global empowerment through handmade design."

The group is Creative Women of the World.

WBOI's Julia Meek met with the organization's founder, Lorelei VerLee, to find out more about its mission.

Fewer than than 6,000 Hoosiers were recorded as homeless this year, a two percent decrease from 2013. The state’s homeless population has seen a steady decline over the last four years.

The Indiana Housing and Community Development Authority conducts what’s called a “point-in-time” count each January.  Coordinating with homeless shelters and outreach groups around the state, the IHCDA determines the number of homeless people on a single night. 

More than a million Hoosiers don’t know where their next meal will come from or when it will come, according to a report from Feeding America.

Nearly 16 percent of Indiana residents are food insecure – that includes nearly 346,000 children.  

More than half likely qualify for federal assistance, such as food stamps.  But 31 percent of those considered food insecure earn income above federal assistance eligibility levels – meaning their only access to help comes from charitable organizations.  

Virginia Alvino

Fort Wayne City Council members dedicated their entire session Tuesday to discussing a new anti-violence plan called "Bridges to a Better Community."                                      

Members of the Fort Wayne Urban League created it in response to the near record number of killings in the city this year.

The plan a large amount of data on the disparity between races when it comes to poverty, education, and crime, and specific recommendations on how to reduce violence.

IYI: Impoverished students need breakfast, too

Aug 10, 2012
Scott Bauer acquired from USDA ARS

As child poverty in Indiana continues to increase, the Indiana Youth Institute is stressing the need for schools to offer breakfast programs.

Ten years ago, child poverty was in the single digits in Indiana.  It now sits at 22 percent. 

There are many ripple effects associated with the increase, including a growing number of students relying on school breakfast programs -- participation is up nearly 60% since 2005.

Still, Indiana Youth Institute President Bill Stanczykiewicz is concerned there are kids who aren’t getting a good breakfast.