Public Artwork

Julia Meek

Fort Wayne's downtown was surprised by a full scale yarn bombing Sunday, leaving the area blanketed in mystery.

At 2:00 p.m. yesterday, guerilla knitters swarmed the city's arts campus, leaving over 1000 square feet of brightly colored, non-lethal textile trail in its wake.

Most of the explosion occurred in the Arts United plaza itself, covering pillars, benches and more than fifteen trees, though some of the kniffiti ric-crocheted into Freimann Square.

While General Anthony Wayne was unharmed, his horse took many multi-colored hits.

Rachelle Reinking

At a press conference today, Mayor Tom Henry and other city officials proposed the creation of a Public Art Program and Public Art Commission.

A City ordinance will be introduced this Tuesday, calling for the creation of the Public Art Program, which would promote and integrate public art throughout the city.

The program would be overseen by a thirteen-member volunteer commission made up of appointments from arts organizations and arts schools, as well as the Fort Wayne City Council and the Mayor's Office.

Courtesy/George Morrison

Fort Wayne sculptor, George Morrison is a retired architect with a with a passion for creating a public artwork that reflects his firm roots in geometry, physics and architectural form.

Courtesy/Smithsonian Institute

Fort Wayne sculptor, Hector Garcia, has established a reputation for his craft over the past 40 years, on regional, national and international levels.

Courtesy/FWFAC

Last spring, the Fort Wayne Free Art Collective was formed, and quietly began leaving small pieces of free artwork around the city, which they call "art drops."

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