StateImpact

Obama Touts Community College Plan in Indianapolis

Feb 6, 2015
Courtesy / White House

President Obama says other states should follow Ivy Tech Community College’s lead when it comes to connecting students to high paying jobs. The president traveled to Indianapolis Friday to tout his plans aimed at getting more people on the track to better wages.

During the event at Ivy Tech, Obama once again explained his plan to make two years of community college free.

Courtesy / Indiana University - Kokomo

Indiana’s legislative leaders are expressing concerns about the increasing number of out of state students at the state’s universities, which could affect state funding to those institutions.

Of Purdue’s undergraduate students, 44 percent are non-Indiana residents, and at IU-Bloomington, 43 percent of the current freshman class comprises out-of-state and international students.

This high number of out-of-state students could affect funding to such institutions, as legislators have expressed disappointment in these high numbers.

StateImpact: When Education Starts Early, Kids Benefit

Jul 3, 2014

This month, the Family and Social Services Administration will announce the five counties selected to participate in the state’s new pre-k pilot program, Indiana’s first big move toward making preschool a priority. 

But many believe a child’s learning needs to be a priority from the beginning of life, well before they ever enter a classroom.

In our weekly education feature, StateImpact Indiana’s Claire McInerny has more on brain development from birth to age four.

Educators Concerned About Quick Turnaround for New Test

Jun 12, 2014

Indiana’s students will take a new standardized test this spring – a year earlier than anticipated.

The test isn’t designed yet but it has to match the standards the state adopted to replace the Common Core.

Education officials and school leaders are worried about the short turnaround.

StateImpact Indiana’s Rachel Morello and Claire McInerny discuss the sudden change in testing plans.

Guidance counselors are supposed to spend a lot of time with students. They help kids decide which classes to take, fill out college scholarship applications and advise them on the path they should choose after they graduate high school.

Indiana Students Improve on National Exam

Nov 8, 2013

Indiana fourth graders made significant gains in their performance on national tests designed to compare their reading and math skills with students across the nation. Federal education officials released the results of the exams Thursday.

From 2011 to this year, Indiana fourth graders average score on both the reading and math tests went up 5 points.  On the 500-point National Assessment of Educational Progress, that might not sound like much. But that’s a bigger jump than all but a handful of states. 

Because Indiana is one of 11 states that doesn’t provide state money for preschool, community groups, philanthropic organizations and even local businesses have stepped in to fill the void.

Indiana is in the middle of an education overhaul, but whether it continues could depend on the outcome of the state superintendent’s race.

For the second year in a row, Indiana third graders will have to pass a high stakes reading test or risk getting held back.

It’s a lot of pressure for 8 and 9 year olds, but for some struggling readers, the IREAD-3 is an even bigger source of anxiety.

That’s because the root cause of their difficulty is dyslexia, a learning disability. Most students with special needs can qualify for a good cause exemption that allows them to move onto fourth grade even if they don’t pass.

It’s just after 2 o’clock on a Thursday afternoon. The sun is high in the sky, and the construction workers digging the foundation of a storage building at Columbus North High School’s new baseball field are about to call it a day.

But once they’re done, they’ll board a yellow bus and go back to school. That’s because the workers at this construction site are high school students.

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