Health Care

Opinion: The Hidden Horrors of Healthcare Reform

Oct 24, 2017
Abraham Schwab

The “self-fulfilling prophecy” was a term first coined by Robert Merton: “a false definition of the situation evoking a new behavior which makes the originally false conception come true." In my view, this term is perhaps overused. But in the case of the efforts of Donald Trump’s administration and the GOP members of Congress, well, if the shoe fits . . . 

Ryan White

On Sept. 11th 2017, IPFW hsoted a panel discussion called Funding Healthcare. Panelists discussed what works and what doesn't work about the way the US healthcare system is financed. 

The event was sponsored by The Civil Society, American Democracy Project, and the IPFW Department of Political Science.  

Andrew Downs of the Mike Downs Center for Indiana Politics moderated the discussion. 

Panelists include: 

Dr. Peter Hanley

Zafar Nazarov, IPFW Department of Economics

Dr. Jon Walker

Courtesy / Abe Schwab

As I wrote in the Fort Wayne Journal Gazette earlier this week, there is something fundamentally undemocratic about the way that Senate Republicans are handling their effort to amend/approve the House version of the American Health Care Act (AHCA).

Courtesy/Lutheran Health Network

Lutheran Health Network is currently owned by Tennessee-based Community Health Systems, but a group of Northeast Indiana doctors wants to buy it from the multi-state health organization.

Opinion: A 'Richer' Appreciation Of The AHCA

May 17, 2017
Mark James / Flickr

There have been a number of people and groups who have been critical of the American Health Care Act. And I’m here to set the record straight. Unlike so many of you, I couldn’t be prouder of my representative, Jim Banks, for sticking to his guns and ignoring reams of empirical evidence, the will of the voters in his district, and the overwhelming concerns expressed by insurers, physicians, and hospitals. There are so many unfounded criticisms of the AHCA that I don’t have time to address them all, but here are a few.

The Mercenary Markets of US Healthcare

Jul 19, 2016
Satoru Kobayashi / Flikr

I never thought that I’d consider buying drugs from Canada. For years I’ve heard rumors about people getting medications from over the border, and now I find myself considering it. You see, we spent $2800 of our health plan’s $3500 deductible on Epipens this Spring. And since those Epipens are only good for about a year, we’ll spend another $2800 (or more) next Spring. And then again the Spring after that. And so on.

Jill Sheridan/IPBS

Twelve-year old McKenzie Ashkettle is not well.

Courtesy / State of Indiana

It’s been nearly six months since HIP 2.0 was approved, and the state has enrolled nearly 300,000 Hoosiers in the health insurance program.  More than a dozen health care advocacy groups and insurers sang the praises of the program at a public forum Thursday.

As of July 1st, a little more than 289,000 residents have signed up for health care coverage through HIP 2.0.  186 thousand of them never had health insurance before.  And 70 percent of enrollees are using HIP Plus, which requires contributions to a health savings account. 

Courtesy / Wikimedia Commons

Hoosiers who receive tax subsidies to reduce the cost of their health insurance through the Affordable Care Act say they’re celebrating after the U.S. Supreme Court issued a ruling protecting those subsidies.

Nearly 160,000 Hoosiers have subsidies that reduce the cost of their insurance by an average of $320 per month. 

Courtesy / Abe Schwab

It turns out that 7 out of 10 surveyed individuals in the U.S. are unaware of the Supreme Court case (and eminent ruling on) King v. Burwell.

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