Indiana National Guard

Annie Ropeik / Indiana Public Broadcasting

 

 Indiana is seeing a boom in manufacturing job creation – outpacing most of the country. And even more jobs will open up as baby boomers retire.

Many businesses are working harder to fill those jobs with military veterans, like 57-year-old Tim Turner.

Right now, he shares a house on a quiet street northwest of downtown Indianapolis with two other formerly homeless veterans.

Brandon Smith / Indiana Public Broadcasting

Governor Mike Pence says he wants all Hoosiers to know that, beginning Monday morning, members of the National Guard will be armed and able to defend themselves.

Governor Pence says the attack on a military installation in Tennessee that left four Marines and a Navy sailor dead made the Indiana National Guard’s new policy necessary and appropriate. 

He says soldiers and airmen with handgun permits can carry their personal guns at all National Guard facilities around the state.

Courtesy / Wikimedia Commons

Legislation approved by a Senate panel Tuesday aims to bolster financial protections for active duty National Guard members and reservists.

The federal Servicemembers Civil Relief Act doesn’t necessarily extend to members of the Indiana National Guard or reservists.  And the Attorney General’s office made a state-level protection bill part of its agenda for the session. 

The measure helps protect Guard members and reservists who’ve been on active duty for at least 30 days from foreclosures and default. 

The head of Indiana’s National Guard,  Adjutant General Martin Umbarger,  announced Tuesday he will retire next year.  

Martin Umbarger assumed command of the Indiana National Guard in March of 2004 under Governor  Joe Kernan. He was reappointed to the position of Adjutant General by Governor Mitch Daniels and Governor Mike Pence.

The Indiana native began his career as a soldier 35 years ago.