Riverfront Development

Abhijitsathe. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Commons

Environmental stewardship. It’s a phrase that many people wouldn’t be able to define, but an IPFW professor wants to bring it to Fort Wayne.

Area groups are trying to build an environmental stewardship facility in Fort Wayne. But what exactly is “environmental stewardship?”

Virginia Alvino / WBOI News

Phase one of Fort Wayne’s riverfront development is one step closer to being  funded. 

The Legacy Joint Funding Committee approved $6 million for the project Wednesday. That money will join $3 million from the Community Foundation, and another $3 million from the Capital Improvement board to be used over the next  two years. 

A key element of the first phase of development is property acquisition. But City  officials say the first steps will be to care for the vegetation along the river banks,  and to complete a comprehensive environmental study.

Virginia Alvino / WBOI News

Fort Wayne Mayor Tom Henry announced some financial progress on riverfront development Thursday. 

Henry says he’s hopeful that a $6 million request of Legacy money will quickly be approved by the Legacy Committee and City Council.

Marvin Mikesell / For WBOI News

The confluence of the three rivers around which Fort Wayne was founded have been pivotal to the success of the city since its founding.

But after decades in which the riverfronts were often taken for granted, there's new life -- and new momentum -- toward developing those spaces, particularly in Downtown Fort Wayne.

On March 26th, WBOI held the latest in its popular "Issues & Ales" series at The Phoenix. The events are meant to bring community leaders and listeners together for a relaxed discussion over dinner and drinks.

Tri-State Watershed Alliance

The 2015 River Summit kicked off Wednesday in Fort Wayne. The multi-day event aims to educate the public about water quality and  recreational opportunities on the rivers.   

The summit Wednesday brought together many federal agencies, county officials,  NGO’s, and agricultural representatives. Dan Wire is the Director of the Tri-State  Watershed Alliance, which organized the summit. He says getting all these  stakeholders together is a rare event.

Join WBOI for Issues & Ales on March 26th!

Mar 10, 2015

Join WBOI's Sean Bueter and Virginia Alvino for Issues & Ales on Thursday, March 26th!  It's a fun, laid-back event that features panels of experts and community leaders discussing important issues in our region.

The first hour will focus on Downtown Development and Downtown Living. We'll look at the critical mass of residential and commercial development projects, discuss the challenges, benefits and future of living downtown, and look at how these projects originated.


Fort Wayne has some grand plans for riverfront development. The City says the first step is to work on riparian buffers – specific areas of plants and soil along the river banks. This land, along with other rocky areas that separate the city from the water, create levees.

But not a lot is known about how to comprehensively improve the levees and environment along the rivers - yet.

North Carolina DENR

There are some large-scale sources of water pollution in Northeast Indiana, but  what we all do at home can make a big impact, too.   We continue our series “The Three Rivers” with a  look at what precautions every resident of Fort Wayne can take to reduce water  pollution. 

SWA/City of Fort Wayne

On Wednesday, a consulting group for the City of Fort Wayne unveiled the first part of its plan to develop the city’s riverfronts.

It’s the latest step in a long process that’s involved city funding, public meetings, and some long wish lists about what exactly we should do with our shorelines in Fort Wayne.

WBOI’s Virginia Alvino has been following the development planning. She sat down with Sean Bueter go discuss the latest. 


City of Fort Wayne

The City of Fort Wayne asked and its residents answered – nearly 2,600 people responded to a survey about what they’d like to see in the future of downtown riverfront development.  

Recreational uses, both on and next to the river, had the most positive responses from the survey – followed by natural habitats and simply interesting places to sit. Mixed use development was close behind. 

People weren’t as interested in housing and winter activities on the river, however.