SCOTUS

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The U.S. Supreme Court ruled this week that an independent redistricting commission in Arizona is, in fact, legal.

The decision opens the door for other states to explore such commissions in an effort to fight gerrymandering. (For a great explanation of gerrymandering, check out this Washington Post article from March.)

Earlier this year, the Indiana General Assembly decided to create a study committee on the issue of redistricting reform.

Courtesy / Indiana Election Division

The U.S. Supreme Court Monday upheld the constitutionality of an independent redistricting commission in Arizona, a system that keeps the redrawing of legislative maps out of the legislature’s hands.  That decision could have a major impact on Indiana as lawmakers prepare to examine ways to take some of the politics out of electoral redistricting.

Indiana legislative leaders – both Republican and Democrat – who’ve long supported redistricting reform overcame a major hurdle this year by gaining support for a redistricting study committee. 

Fort Wayne's Same-Sex Couples Celebrate Marriage Ruling

Jun 26, 2015
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Same-sex couples in Fort Wayne are celebrating Friday’s decision by the U.S. Supreme Court to legalize gay marriage in all 50 states.

The 5-4 decision by the Court requires that all states license and recognize same-sex unions. Before the decision, only about two-thirds of states allowed those couples to marry.

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Hoosiers who receive tax subsidies to reduce the cost of their health insurance through the Affordable Care Act say they’re celebrating after the U.S. Supreme Court issued a ruling protecting those subsidies.

Nearly 160,000 Hoosiers have subsidies that reduce the cost of their insurance by an average of $320 per month. 

NPR / Doby Photography

Nina Totenberg has a lot of superlatives to her name.

As NPR's Legal Affairs Correspondent, she's a built a career as a legendary journalist, with a voice and style all her own. She's won countless awards for her work covering the U.S. Supreme Court and other legal matters. And she’s one of NPR’s "Founding Mothers," the group of female reporters who shaped the network from its earliest days.

One thing she's not: a fortune-teller.

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After traveling to Washington, D.C., for the Supreme Court arguments on gay marriage, one of the plaintiffs in the case against Indiana’s same-sex marriage ban says he’s cautiously optimistic.

Greg Hasty and his husband C.J. Vallero were one of many couples who stood outside the U.S. Supreme Court to express their views on the same-sex marriage debate.

Hasty wasn’t able to get into the actual courtroom—there’s only room for a few members of the public--but he says after being in D.C. and listening to the arguments he’s eagerly awaiting the court’s decision.

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  The Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in King vs. Burwell Wednesday, a case that challenges one of the primary components of the Affordable Care Act. The outcome could affect hundreds of thousands of Hoosiers.

People like to compare the Affordable Care Act to a stool with three legs. The first leg mandates that insurers can’t discriminate against potential buyers; the second leg requires people to have insurance; and the third provides those who don’t have enough money to buy insurance subsidies so they can afford it.

Advocates on both sides of Indiana’s same sex marriage debate are preparing for a fight after the U.S. Supreme Court’s rulings Wednesday clear the way for the states to decide the marriage question.